Infection Control Today

MAR 2019

ICT delivers to infection preventionists & their colleagues in the operating room, sterile processing/central sterile, environmental services & materials management, timely & relevant news, trends & information impacting the profession & the industry

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10 www.infectioncontroltoday.com ICT March 2019 800.525.1698 | tomimist.com EPA registered disinfectant that is quick and easy to use throughout your facility. The only active ingredient is 7.8% hydrogen peroxide making disinfection compatable with a variety of materials including rubbers, fnished surfaces, and all electronic devices. THE DIFFERENCE OF STERAMIST DISINFECTION IMPLEMENT STERAMIST INTO YOUR FACILITY this testing must be maintained. Additionally, some manufacturers require that the efficacy of each lot of test strips be tested; such requirements are described in the package insert for the test strip. If this type of testing (also known as quality assurance testing) is required, the performance and results of the test must be recorded, and the records must be maintained. The date that the test strip bottle was opened and the date by which the strips should be used should be documented on the test strip bottle. The test strips should be discarded at the end of the timeframe indicated by the manufacturer (which could be before the stated expiration date on the bottle). Even if MEC testing shows that the concentration is still adequate, the solution must be discarded when it reaches the manufacturer-specifed expiration date. In general, high-level disinfectants should not be "topped off" when the solution level has declined because of evaporation or use. In summary, temperature is only one of many factors that can infuence the outcome of high level disinfection. In order for the process to succeed, it is critical that the IFUs for the device manufacturer as well as the HLD manufacturer are reviewed and followed at all times. There are many steps in the high level disinfection process. It all starts with cleaning the device according to the IFUs. Then following all the IFUs for use of the high level disinfectant. Failure is not an option. The patient is depending on their device to be safe when used. Nancy Chobin, RN, AAS, ACSP, CSPM, CFER, is a sterile processing consultant and educator. References: Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. Chemical Sterilization and High-Level Disinfection in Health Care Facilities. ANSI/AAMI ST58:2013. Arlington (VA): AAMI, 2013. Basics of Sterile Processing 6th edition, Sterile Processing University, LLC. Centers for Disease Control. "Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Health Care Facilities" 2008, Updated February 15, 2017. One type of MEC (MRC) test strips Ò Temperature is only one of many factors that can infuence the outcome of high level disinfection. In order for the process to succeed, it is critical that the IFUs for the device manufacturer as well as the HLD manufacturer are reviewed and followed at all times.

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